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Introduction

The storm season is here, and this means it’s time to prepare your boat for impending hurricanes. It can be a stressful time, so we’ve put together a checklist of things you should do to get ready.

Prepare Your Boat For Approaching Hurricanes.

You have a lot of responsibilities as a captain. Preparing your boat for an approaching storm is one of them. You’ll also want to make sure your family, friends and crew are prepared for the season as well.

  • Make sure all loose items on deck are tied down or secured in the cabin.
  • Remove any inflatable fenders from around the side decks and dock lines if they will not be used during this time period (they can get damaged by flying debris).
  • Check all navigation lights, running lights, masthead light (if equipped), stern light (if equipped), radio equipment and running lights at night when storms approach or when heavy rain is occurring in your area. If these items are not working properly they will need to be repaired prior to use during the hurricane season.

Secure your boat.

Hurricane season is upon us and it’s important to take precautions so you can be ready for the worst. When it comes to preparing your boat for hurricane season, there are several things you can do before a storm hits to make sure that your boat is safe and secure.

First, make sure all loose items are secured by tying them down. This includes lines, fenders and sails. You don’t want these flying around during high winds! Make sure your boat is properly tied to the dock and that all lines are tight so they don’t come loose during heavy winds or waves. Also check hatches (doors) on deck; if they have any type of vent or opening in them then they should be closed tightly as well! Finally, make sure that any furniture or equipment not strapped down on board gets put away so that nothing falls off into ocean water during rough seas caused by strong storms. Like hurricanes generate across Florida’s coastline where many boats spend summer months at anchor waiting for their owners’ return.

Inspect your boat.

A good inspection of your boat will cover a lot of ground, so to speak. You’ll want to check for items that may be loose or not secure, such as fuel lines and hoses. You should also inspect the engine compartment, bilge pumps and other mechanical equipment on board. The boat’s utility systems should be checked for water levels and any damage caused by debris in previous storms (such as broken windows).

  • Check battery banks for charge levels and inspect them for leaks or corrosion that could lead to an explosion if left unchecked. There’s no point in having power outlets if you don’t have electricity! If you’ve got an inverter installed on board make sure it’s working properly before heading out into open waters during hurricane season—you never know when those pesky sharks might get hungry again!
  • Make sure life jackets are readily accessible at all times; they’re critical safety gear when dealing with rough seas or flooding conditions which could occur during hurricanes or storm surges.

If you’re on land and not in the water, make sure that everything is secured properly before evacuating or heading out to a safe location away from danger zones (roofs tend to collapse during hurricanes). It’s also important to have an emergency plan for your family so everyone knows what to do if something bad happens.

Know where to go in case of evacuation.

If you’re in a hurricane evacuation area, there’s a good chance that you won’t be allowed to stay on your boat. You may need to find another place to stay or go inland.

You’ll want to know where the safest evacuation shelters are located, how many people each shelter can hold and what rules apply when staying there. This information is usually available through local authorities such as police departments and fire departments.

When planning for an emergency off-site shelter, be prepared for long lines of traffic on roads leading up and into the city center. If possible, plan out several routes from different directions to your final destination so that if one route gets blocked by traffic congestion or damage from high winds or flooding caused by heavy rains associated with a tropical storm or hurricane—or both—you will not become stranded without access back home again

Top off fuel tanks and fill any portable containers.

The next thing you should do is top off your fuel tanks. This is important because fuel is one of the most important things to have on board, and it’s heavy. You don’t want to be caught in a situation where you have no way to get out of an area at all because your boat doesn’t have enough fuel or power. The amount of fuel needed depends on how big your boat is; if it’s a small dinghy that only has one engine and uses around 100 gallons per day, then you’ll need less than someone who owns a massive yacht with multiple engines running all the time. The best advice we can give when it comes to planning for storm season: Don’t assume that just because there aren’t storms where you live now, there won’t be during hurricane season!

Another thing to do before leaving port would be to fill up any portable containers with water as well as food items such as canned goods or other dried foods (such as MREs) which will last longer without refrigeration than fresh produce or meat products like chicken breasts etc..

Turn off power to the dock pedestal.

If you have shore power cords, turn off the power to the dock pedestal. If possible, remove them from receptacles and disconnect the cables from the boat. If you can’t remove them, disconnect the shore power cord from your boat.

If Electrical Service is available, turn off the circuit breakers for the dockside receptacle and for any other circuits that are not essential for safety or weatherproofing of your boat (i.e., battery chargers, lights, etc.).

You should always be prepared for the worst when it comes to hurricanes and storms. You never know what might happen, or how long the storm will last. If you’re able to turn off your boat’s power completely, do so. This can prevent any electrical hazards from happening due to lightning strikes or water damage.

If you are unable to turn off your boat’s power entirely, make sure all circuits are turned off and that they stay turned off until after the storm passes through your area. Make sure you know where the circuit breakers are in your boat and how to turn them on/off properly (and vice versa). Also remember: even if all circuits have been turned off correctly prior, they’ll likely need resetting once everything is safe again (especially if there was a power surge during high winds).

Disconnect wind generator power cables forward of the breaker panel and remove all antennas, flag halyards and outriggers; remove anything else that may be damaged by flying debris or heavy winds.

Disconnect wind generator power cables forward of the breaker panel and remove all antennas, flag halyards and outriggers; remove anything else that may be damaged by flying debris or heavy winds. If you have a wooden boom for your spinnaker, it should be secured to the deck with eye bolts.

If you have a large electrical motor such as an air conditioning compressor, generator or refrigeration unit, make sure that these are securely mounted in their housing and securely fastened to the boat so that they cannot be dislodged by high winds or wave action during rough weather conditions.

Check all through-hulls for proper sealing and functioning of seacocks and valves. Do not open any seacocks at this time. Section: Thoroughly flush all supplies of drinking water from plumbing systems on a regular basis to prevent microorganism growth such as algae, slime or bacteria in the water system, which could cause illness if consumed during a prolonged period away from fresh water supplies.

You must check all through-hulls for proper sealing and functioning of seacocks and valves. Do not open any seacocks at this time. Thoroughly flush all supplies of drinking water from plumbing systems on a regular basis to prevent microorganism growth such as algae, slime or bacteria in the water system, which could cause illness if consumed during a prolonged period away from fresh water supplies. If your ship is equipped with a generator it’s wise to load fuel in case you have another power outage during the storm or its aftermath.

Conclusion

Finally, make sure to keep these tips in mind! If you’re not prepared for a hurricane, it can be a stressful time for everyone on board. By following these steps and doing your research ahead of time, you’ll be able to weather any storm that comes your way without any issues.

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